Franksville, Wisconsin Project Build

Discussion in 'Crew Lounge' started by jamie@M160, Apr 4, 2011.

  1. jamie@M160

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    #1 jamie@M160, Apr 4, 2011
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2018
    This is the discussion topic for our Franksville, Wisconsin modular model railroad project. Feel free to critique, ask questions, and more.

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    Article Index Page on M160: http://www.model160.com/franksville-wisconsin-project/

    Individual articles on M160:

    Part 1 - Introduction

    Part 2 - Laying Spline Roadbed

    Part 3 - Land Contours

    Part 4 - Cork and Track

    Part 5 - Painting Track

    Part 6 - Switch Machines and Wiring

    Part 7 - Building the Franksville Depot

    Part 8 - Klema Buildings Part 1

    Part 9 - Klema Buildings Part 2

    Part 10 - Klema Coal Bins

    Part 11 - H.P. Hansen's Feed Mill


    I'll start adding various updates in posts below so everyone can follow along and ask questions.
     
  2. jamie@M160

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    Welcome to our modutrak Franksville, Wisconsin n-scale module build story. Our plan here is to run this story in a multiple part series highlighting the construction of two modutrak modular layout sections. This project will be based on a prototype of the Milwaukee Road line that ran from Chicago, Illinois to Milwaukee, Wisconsin set in the 1950's (or so). I'll be working from a lot of black and white photos (and a few color) of the prototype in that period. The town of Franksville, Wisconsin still exists today, although the railroad siding is gone and the passing sidings have been removed. A number of the old structures along the industry siding are gone or changed, but a few still exist today...

    FULL STORY...

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  3. jamie@M160

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    Franksville, Wisconsin Project Part 3: Land Contours

    So I originally thought that I would try and fit the town of Franksville on one module. After finding the black and white aerial images (above) and saw just how extensive the sidings were in Franksville, I had to spread it over two modules to do it right. Here is the overall trackplan for the five modules that stretch from Franksville to Caledonia:

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    North is to the left. All of the track plans are based on the prototype drawings including the sidings and crossover points. The standard track is Atlas Code 55 and mainline turnouts are #10 with industry sidings being #7 turnouts.

    Each module is designed to be lightweight and strong. The base pieces are constructed from 1/8 inch birch plywood top and sides with 3/4 inch birch plywood. Here is what the underside of a module looks like (with leg pockets installed in the corners):

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    The above module has the masonite sides added to it already (which gives the module its bending rigidity).

    Here is a closeup of the pocket corner:

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    and here is a corner of a straight module from the top side:

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    The base birch module gets masonite end caps (which has a standard land contour which helps match up ends of different people's modules) and masonite sides. We use a pseudo masonite spline road bed to elevate the track 2" above the module "floor". Here is a module with roadbed spline drying (this is the south Franksville module that has the two track mainline and the industry siding which is why it is wider):

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    Once that dries, a masonite cap is glued to the top of the roadbed. After that cap dries, I took a router and a flush bit and trimmed the edges flush:

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    this is what the flush bit looks like:

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    once the flush trimming was done I cut and glued the masonite end caps on:

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    and here is where I'm currently at with the south franksville module:

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    The next step will be to cut 2" pink building construction foam to fit the empty spaces on either side of the tracks before I add the masonite sides. I find it easier to shape the foam before I glue it down (based on past trial and error of course).

    So here is the original Franksville single module that I previously built:

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    The above module will now become the north franksville module. I needed to get it up and running for a train show, so I completed the trackwork, wired it up, put the foam in place, added the masonite sides and painted the pink foam a light brown color. The masonite sides that are exposed also get a coat of green paint that matches all the rest of the modules. You can also see where I was doodling the locations of streets and such before I decided to split this into two modules.

    So the first thing I did last weekend was cut a land contour into the front face of the masonite with a jig saw. I cut through the masonite with the foam in place on purpose (which I'll show why in a second):

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    So the foam is exposed now and the masonite face is trimmed. Next I took a Tippy hot wire foam cutter tool:

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    and made an angle cut just to the outside of the maintenance of way area:

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    This takes a little bit of patience to let the foam cutting tool melt its way through the foam. If you try and force it along too hard you'll bend the hot wire. The fumes from the melting foam aren't particularly good for your health so do this in a well ventilated place.

    After I make the angle cut I then go and use the hot wire tool with a different attachment to cut the side profile of the foam. You can see the original cut through the front masonite fascia left a nice cut through the foam about 2.5 inches in:

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    Again use patience and let the tool do the work. Also if you avoid a cutting motion back and forth you'll have less sanding and shaping to get things smooth later on. After cutting through the foam following the fascia profile it looked like this:

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    Then I broke the remaining foam piece off:

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    and yes, Wisconsin is *not* all flat level farmland - there are gentle rolling hills everywhere. So this is what the final looked like after I sanded a few rough edges smooth with sandpaper:

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    I'll go over the landforms with lightweight spackle to fill in voids, add some variation and a few other things prior to paint and scenery.
     
  4. jamie@M160

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    Franksville, Wisconsin Project Part 4: Cork and Track
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    So in Part 3 I showed how I create land contours on the "north" Franksville module (remember there are two modules that will make up Franksville, Wisconsin). For Part 4 we go back to the "south" module and add cork road bed from Midwest Products. The Midwest Products cork provides a roadbed foundation that I'll glue down Atlas Code 55 flex track to. The cork is pre-split down the middle and I use a straight razor blade to gently cut through the rest of the pre-cut split so I get a nice clean split. What you end up with is two halves of the road bed. Once you draw the center lines where your track is going to ultimately go, you can glue down (I use clear Liquid Nails) the cork road bed one half to the left and right of the track center line you drew. The two halves but up against each other to create the shoulders of the road bed and keep your centerline intact so you can glue the track down on the same centerline. Here is the cork road bed down for each mainline. I run it off the edges of the module so I can trim it flush with a razor after the glue dries.

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    For the industry siding, I wanted something that sat a little bit lower than the double-track mainline, so I found some thinner 1/16th inch cork sheet material at Hobby Lobby. I put a couple pieces of track on it to see how it looked:

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    I also cut the 2" inch building foam I got from my local Home Depot. I used a straight razor and straight edge to score it and then snap the pieces off. I haven't glued them down yet as I want to determine land forms first and it is easier to trim these pieces before they are glued in place.

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    So the next step is wiring up the track pieces. First I laid the track in place to rough it in and determine where to run feeders. I need to watch out for the locations of turnout controls/Tortoises and a couple of structural members at the ends and middle of the module. Here is the overhead view:

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    Next is the process I use to attach feeder wires (see illustration below):

    1. On the Atlas Code 55 flex track I flip the track piece over and cut one (or two depending on the section) of the plastic tie joiners.

    2. Then I gently pull the ties apart

    3. I take a flat file to the backside of the rails to rough them up so the solder sticks better.

    4. Then I add a small pool of soldier to the rail. I try and minimize the amount of solder and also line them as evenly between the rails as I can. Before doing this step, make sure the rails are even at the ends as one rail is designed to slip through the ties so the track flexes.

    5. I cut the wire to length, strip the ends and then bend a 90 degree angle into the end and tin them up with solder.

    6. Lastly I solder the feeders to the back side of the rail and push the ties back together (I need to push these together a little more). Once the track is painted and ballasted, the feeder wires largely disappear. The only thing to watch out for is melting ties since you're working in very tight quarters with the soldering iron.

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    Next, I use rail joiners and connect all the pieces of track for the northbound and southbound mainlines. Then I carefully mark the locations of the feeder holes and then drill them. I drilled the holes with a 12" long drill bit that I picked up at Home Depot. To make it easier to pass the wires through the various layers of Masonite and birch, I turn the module over and use a larger drill bit to make larger holes on the bottom. That way the wires pass through a lot easier and don't get hung up as much. Here is the track waiting to be glued down with the feeder wires already dropped through:

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    To glue the track down I used Liquid Nails Clear Seal All-Purpose Sealant. This is a completely clear material that comes in a tube. I've used Liquid Nails for Projects as well, but figured I'd try the clear stuff this time around. To attach the track I run a bead of the clear sealant down the centerline of the cork. Then I use my finger to spread it out nice and thin. This stuff remains tacky for a while and gives you at least 15-20 minutes of working time which is good if you need to realign stuff. I keep some moist papertowels around to wipe off extra sealant from my fingers as I spread it on the cork. You want the material to go on pretty thin so it doesn't ooze up between the ties. Here is a photo of the clear sealant down (shiny stuff on the cork). You can see that I left a gap just to the right of the feeder wires where the turnout controls run across as you don't want to glue those down (!):

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    And here is an overall photo of all the track down. There are a few gaps where the rail joiners are that I need to fill with extra ties. I also filled in the space between the cork where the crossover/switches are with lightweight spackle (white stuff under crossover).

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    Next up in Part 5 is painting the track to get rid of that nasty plastic shine.
     
  5. jamie@M160

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    Franksville, Wisconsin Project Part 5: Painting Track

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    Atlas Code 55 track makes a big difference when you want to achieve a more realistic looking scale track. The smaller rail height and finer detail is a welcome change. However the rails and plastic ties needs some paint to help bring the colors in line and knock down all that shine. I use PollyScale Roof Brown and spray everything with an airbrush. You need to make sure you keep the airbrush perpendicular to the rails so that you hit the spikes head on and get equal paint cover around each spike. Otherwise if you hit it at an angle, you’ll end up with shiny rail showing. Also, with flex trak, one of the rails slides in the ties so you need to paint the rail after you have glued it down to the layout. If you try and paint it first and then flex/bend the track around a curve, the non-painted nickel plated rail will be exposed behind the spikes and you’ll spend time touching up a ton of little spots. Before the paint completely hardens, I take a small block of wood scrap and scrape the paint off of the tops of the rails. I also run the wood block down each rail at a 45 degree angle so that the paint is removed evenly on the edges, otherwise you get little jagged paint edges where the paint rail head meet that looks like crap in photos.

    So from this:

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    to this:

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    After letting everything dry over night I like to then take a small brush and a plastic lid and mix up a slightly darker and slightly lighter version of the Roof Brown and paint individual ties here and there contrasting colors. While subtle, it helps add a little variation to the ties. I mix 50/50 Roof Brown and Grimey Black for the dark and 60/40 Roof Brown and Milwaukee Road Grey (you can use whatever lighter color to mix that you choose) for the lighter shade.

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    This gives you an idea of the subtle variations all becoming part of the scene:

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    Finally I ran a switcher back and forth over the track slowly to check for any dirty or dead spots.

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    Next up in Part 6 are turnout controls and wiring.
     
  6. jamie@M160

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    Franksville, Wisconsin Project Part 6: Switch Machines and Wiring

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    So for this installment I'm going to install Tortoise Slow Motion Switch Machines to control the turnouts. Circuitron Electronics produces these and you can find out more information on their products HERE. First the kit comes with a piece of stiff wire, a screw to hold it in place, the switch machine itself, a plasic slider piece that can be used to adjust the fulcrum point and detailed instructions. Here is a photo of the pieces that come with the Tortoise. I already soldiered on wires to the bottom of the tortoise, leaving enough extra wire to be able to make my connections later.

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    The metal wire is what actually attaches to your turnout and moves back and forth to change the turnout direction. Since the tracks sit on 2" inches of Masonite spline we need to use longer wire to reach the turnout throw bar. So we found some music wire in the same diameter that came in two foot lengths that we can cut up to use instead. You can use a pair of pliers to bend the wire to the correct shape. You will trim the extra off after you install it. So the first thing I did was bend the wire according to their diagram on the instruction sheet:

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    The included instruction sheet also has a template you can cut out as a guide to use when drilling the hole necessary to install the unit.

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    The Tortoise instructions show two ways to mount it, one by very simply screwing in the four screws to attach it, the other involves double sided tape and caulk in addition to the screws to help absorb some of the noise the switch machine makes. I just used a hybrid of putting some double sided foam tape on top and screwing it in. This seems to help with the noise a little bit. I don't think the noise is that big of a deal, but everyone is different. Here it is mounted in place:

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    Once mounted you can then fish the stiff wire through the hole and plastic fulcrom piece to the turnout throw . Then you just need to attach the locking screw to hold the wire in place on the machine. The Atlas Code 55 turnouts have a hole in the turnout throw bar already, but I ended up making another hole a little closer to the turnout itself as, to me, it looks a little cleaner and moves the wire closer to the trackbed which makes ballasting around it a little easier in my experience.

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    So the modutrak modules use a unique turnout control utilizing an RCA jack. When the modules are on display at a show, we have to worry about prying fingers and wouldn't want someone to throw a random turnout using the typical push button or flip-switch control. The RCA jack allows for a flush interface and a shorted-out RCA plug to control the turnout. We'll do a full feature on this system at a later date but here is what it looks like when it is complete.

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    I also installed the facia boards on the sides, painted them and also applied some earth colored paint to most of the pink foam.

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    The next installment will cover the start of all the structure building.
     
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    Franksville, Wisconsin Project Part 7: Building The Franksville Depot

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    Franksville, Wisconsin is located off of Highway K approximately west and slightly north of Racine, Wisconsin between Chicago and Milwaukee. The Milwaukee Road ran through the center of town and Franksville had its own depot. The depot was torn down in the 1960’s as it had little at that point. Here is a Don Ross photo taken in the 1950’s of the depot:

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    And here is the location relative to the town in an aerial photo also taken in the 1950’s:

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    So I decided a field trip was in order to try and take a look at what remnants might remain of the old building. The Klema mill and store is still there today, but the lumber yard on the other side of the tracks is gone. Likewise, the depot was torn down in the 1950’s, but the footprint of the building still remains in the weeds.

    With enough information to think I can tackle this no problem (yeah, right) I started to sketch the building out in a vector drawing program (Illustrator in this case). I tried to align all the pieces I need to cut out of styrene in such a way as to minimize waste. I drew the window and door elements based on Grandt Line doors and windows.

    Once drawn out, I then printed it on cardstock and mocked it up with the other buildings (more on those coming soon) to see how everything looked proportionally on the module:

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    Overall I was happy with the size and proportions and constructed the building to this point:

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    Using Grandt Line doors and windows, I used the laser printout of the drawing I made and taped it over a sheet of styrene (clap board in this case) to trace over with a razor blade and straight edge. The paper test shingles were replaced with American Model Builders peel and stick diamond shingles and painted a maroon color. I’ll cover in detail building one of these structures more thoroughly in a separate article.

    Next I needed a depot platform and foundation bottom, so I used some N Scale Architect modern brick styrene sheet and some styrene boxcar side material to use as flooring inside. The brick was painted and then washed with a light grey water/alcohol mix for mortar. Various chalks were used to further highlight the mortar and add some weathering. I then ran some rough sandpaper in the direction of the grain that I wanted on the wood flooring. Then the flooring color was created by painting the styrene with Kilz primer first and then applying washes of roof brown and black paint paint in thin layers till it builds up and looks right. Then a final wash of a drop or two of india ink mixed with half a cup of rubbing alcohol brings out the lines of the planks.

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    Then the depot was test fitted in place:

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    I also added a piece of styrene to the platform end cap next to the tracks that I also painted and weathered to make it look like wood:

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    Next were the eve brackets which were just pieces of square styrene used as dimensional lumber. I also made a mail box out of styrene bits, added station signs and made a Western Union sign to hang outside. Lastly I attempted to make a screen door as well out of clear acetate that was scribed and given a light coating of dull coat to make it look like screen material.

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    Next up are more structures on this same module as well as the decision to add an additional scenery module to extend our siding and make it more useful.
     
  8. jamie@M160

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    [​IMG]

    Franksville, Wisconsin is located off of Highway K approximately west and slightly north of Racine, Wisconsin between Chicago and Milwaukee - on the Milwaukee Road line. In the drawing above, Franksville sits to the right and there are a number of structures that we will be building for these two modules.

    Here is an aerial view of the various buildings circa 1950's:

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    The buildings we will be working on in this installment are the Klema Feed Mill specific buildings. Their property includes the coal bins seen above, but we will be covering that in a separate piece. Since the Klema mill buildings still exist today (albeit with different paint and quite a few years of wear) I decided a field trip was in order. Here is a photo of the mill as it stood in 2010:

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    Here is the Klema Store as it stood in 2010:

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    Unfortunately the lumber yard is gone today but some digging around gives us an idea (in color no less) of what the structure looked like back then. Interestingly this photo was snapped from inside a speeder that was stored in the Franksville depot:

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    So. I sat down to start drawing these buildings out in illustrations. I first printed them on a laser printer on heavy card stock so I could see how they looked next to each other:

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    Then I used the drawings and a craft cutter (like an ink jet printer, but instead with a knife to cut things instead of a print head to print things). This will score styrene sheets enough to usually just carefully snap the pieces apart when you are done:

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    From there assembly started (pieces just stacked for now):

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    I used Builders In Scale corrugated metal siding material on the sides of the buildings:

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    and then airbrushed over it with a grey primer color and created a decal on a black and white laser printer for the signage:

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    Next I assembled, painted and decaled the lumber building (I did go back and touch up the sides of the roof!). The roof tar paper is just strips of masking tape painted over. Windows and door are brass pieces I had from a fret:

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    Here are some of the partially built structures sitting on the module:

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    We will continue the second half of these buildings, plus the gravel parking areas in the next installment this week. Thanks for following along and as always if you have any questions, feel free to ask in our discussion forum topic linked below.
     
  9. jamie@M160

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    I’m at a point where I can start to plant buildings into the modules semi-permanently. I like to use some piano wire super glued to the corners to push the buildings into the foam base. I also run glue into the holes so they remain snug and don’t move, but if I need to dig them out, I can still do it. Worst case I can carefully “break” the CA bond on the piano wires and pull the structure up that way as well. Being that these are portable modules, crap happens and sometimes I have to “fix” things.

    Anyway, the lumber building will be the first thing I’m work on. I recently added some interior details with some beams and storage areas. They don’t show up well in this photo, but you get the idea:

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    At this point the building is just sitting on the module. I need to make some repairs/improvements to the dirt yard in front of the building before I “plant” the building more permanently. Once it is attached I then go back and build the dirt up around the building, add weeds and so on so that it looks like the building is part of the scenery as opposed to sitting *on* the scenery.

    To get the dirt between the track and to build it up on the outsides, I used some 1/8 inch thick self-sticking cork that I picked up at Hobby Lobby. After I cut the cork, I laid it in between the rails to build it up and also added it to the outsides of the rails. Then I took a brush and some white glue and carefully painted the surface of the cork and then sifted some dirt over the top. Once the glue is covered with at least an 1/8 to 1/4 inch of dirt I take a sheet of paper and gently press down on the dirt to compact it a bit. Then I mask off the rails and center portion of the track, mist everything with 90% alcohol and then diluted white glue. This gave me a good base layer of dirt that when dry actually had some cracks that formed just like real dried-out dirt.

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    The flangeways need to be cleaned out a bit more (as does the track itself). I also will go around once it is completely dry and rub it down a bit to give it a more worn and smoother look.

    The yard will have a wood fence around a portion of it and there will be a transition area full of weeds and such between the yard on the street (as well as a drainage ditch). There is also an access road out of the lumber yard. These details will all jump out once I start to add details and greenery.

    That said, I have been working on piles of lumber materials and the fence pieces. I’m going to add some thin piano wire in a few key spots to replace a couple of fence supports so it has a little more holding it up. The detail on these RS Laser pieces are great, but it is very fragile. I may have to add some plexiglass to the viewing side of this module for shows so I’m not replacing fence all the time.

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    Close up of the fence section:

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    You can see the finished “stained” fence if you scroll up above. Lastly for the lumber yard, I built an out-shed behind the building to help corral the scene in a bit. This is a styrene built structure (I sand the styrene in one direction to create wood grain) that I primed with thinned Kilz primer and then applied coats of thinned black and brown acrylic paints. Finally I give it a couple coats of an india ink/alcohol wash:

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    The Klema building closest to the tracks is now mounted in place and got some experimental weathering. I’m going to work on that some more to try and improve the look:

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    On the other side, the Klema feed mill and structures also got test fitted. I also made some cement piers for the loading dock out of anchor bolt cement that I poured into styrene forms. They are pretty beat up on the prototype, so I’m striving to give this building an old weathered look:

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    Lastly, I’ve built the Klema store and it can be seen here for placement:

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    So before all these buildings get mounted “mostly” permanently, I need to build the gravel lot they sit on. First I bought some sanded and non-sanded grout from Home Depot. I picked the color “Snow White” as the label made it look a little more off-white and not so stark bright white. It isn’t as tan colored as it looks on the label, but I think it is just about right. I bought both the non-sanded and the sanded as I wanted to try them out. The non-sanded is a bit too much like flour and ends up looking chalky and too smooth once you hit it with water. The sanded grout gives it some texture which looks more realistic. I mixed them both for this lot, but that’s not a necessity (I just wanted to use up the products I bought).

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    So I pour small piles of grout on the area I want to cover and then spread it out carefully, raking it out and distributing it out to the edges where I try and keep it a little thinner. You’ll want to make sure you get the grout only where you want it and brush it off the areas where you don’t want it. Otherwise when you apply the water to it, any place there is grout it will be a pain in the a$$ to dig out (like in between ties!). Once you have it raked out to a fairly uniform depth, take a sheet of paper and gentle lay it over the top and push down evenly with your hands on top of the paper. You can feel it compressing and it should be fairly even when you lift the paper. You can take the paper and gently smooth out ridges or other uneven spots and then reapply even pressure to compress it again.

    I take a brush and touch up the edges and try and get them relatively even, but in real life gravel does get all over the place, so you are just trying to remove the heavy unevenness and things that don’t look right. Once it is all compressed and looks the way you want it, I take paper towels to cover/mask anything I don’t want getting wet. Then I use a misting bottle with some water in it and hold it about 18-20 inches above the grout and mist the whole thing heavily. You should start to see the grout look wet. When you just start to see actual ponding or saturation of water on top of the grout, you’ve gone far enough. You don’t want pooling of water as it will float the grout away and leave a mess, so be careful how much water you put down. Here is what it looked like after misting it:

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    You can always go back after it dries and add more water if you think it needs it.

    Once it dries it will look like this:

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    Overall this technique seems to work really well and leaves a nice textured surface that has enough variation in it to look more like real gravel (as opposed to just painting some sandpaper white).

    Later on after the buildings are in place I’ll go back and weather the roads and add cracks and such. I’ll also take some white weathering powder (or the non-sanded grout) and drag a little of the gravel lot gunk onto the road.

    Last detail for this installment is the drive-up scale outside the Klema Store. The scale hasn’t ever been replaced and here is what it looks like today:

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    So I scratched built one, weathered the wood a bit and need to finish details before cutting it in:

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    And that about covers it for this update. Lots more structures to be built and eventually mounted and detailed. Stay tuned…
     
  10. jamie@M160

    jamie@M160 Administrator
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    Next up on our list is to build a condensed version of the Klema coal bins just to the north of the feed mill. The coal bins are no longer there today, but you can see them in this circa 1950’s aerial photo:

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    I decided to scratch build these from styrene. Essentially using strips roughly similar to dimensional lumber, I cut each board individually then sanded each one in the direction of wood grain with 80 grit sandpaper and started constructing each bin. Here is a test fit during the construction:

    [​IMG]



    The next step was to prime the pieces with white Kilz primer that is diluted 50/50 with water. Once that dries, the next step is to paint with various washes of black and brown paint (again diluted with water). Once you get the look you’re going for, I finally add a wash of India ink and isopropyl alcohol (about 2-3 drops of ink to a half a cup of rubbing alcohol). After that all dries here is where things are at:

    [​IMG]

    and another view:

    [​IMG]



    Next I weathered up the area around and underneath the coal piles a bit with black chalk powder. Any black weathering powder will work:

    [​IMG]

    Next are the coal piles themselves. I carved these out of pieces of spare pink insulating foam I had laying around. I tried to give it some variation with the size of the piles, plus making it look like they have been dug into a bit:

    [​IMG]

    Next the foam gets a coat or two of black paint:

    [​IMG]

    Finally I add some ground coal dust that I picked up from Arizona Rock and Mineral. I sift it into a couple different sizes to reflect different grades or sizes of coal in the different bins. I also weathered more around the coal bins as all those pieces around the area get crushed into the surface:

    [​IMG]

    And here it is from more of a ground level shot:

    [​IMG]

    In our next installment we’ll start flushing out more details on the Klema buildings and start building out the other feed mill and oil structures.
     
  11. jamie@M160

    jamie@M160 Administrator
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    The next building on our list is the H.P. Hansen’s feed mill. The mill building itself was built separately from a single story brick building that was added on. However, the brick portion of the building was there in the 1950’s as you can see in this photo:

    [​IMG]

    So first was to tackle the basic wood structure. I drew this in Illustrator and then used a Cricut machine to score all the pieces of styrene. The windows and doors are brass pieces from Micron Art. Also, I had always wanted to try making a form out of styrene and using mortar cement to create a cement platform, so I decided to use that for the loading dock instead of wood.

    [​IMG]

    The brick structure I built using some old Fine N Scale Products cinderblock resin walls. This proved to be a tricky material to work with as it can warp over time (which it did) and isn’t completely straight to start with. In the end I got it to work enough to be usable, but I would go a different route next time. Here are the two buildings just set on top of the module to see placement:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    When it came time to paint the building, I had one photo to work from making it a little tricky. Here is the building with basic paint and decals again placed on the layout to check positioning:

    [​IMG]

    Meanwhile back at the Klema buildings, I added paint, started on some details and signage. The Purina signs were taken directly from photos and printed on a color laser printer on standard paper and then sanded lightly to thin them out and further deteriorate the edges a bit. The black paint I used on the roof went on and dried with some shine to it, which was odd since it was a matte black that I used. Oh well, some weathering powders will tone that down. Once the buildings are permanently mounted, I can get to those details:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    Next up are continuing details and structures including the Franksville Oil Company and an extension module to make our siding a bit longer.
     

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